Bencore in the new setting for the Musée des Arts Decoratifs in Parigi

What does a design museum look like today? Which are the best solutions to attract an audience more and more passionate about design and more and more informed and demanding?

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Il Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Parigi. (Foto Ercole Salinaro)

The new arrangement at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, results from an analysis conducted since 2013, with the new direction of Olivier Gabet.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

These thoughts led to a simple and “light” set-up, which is easy to read, and allows to move the products quickly and comfortably.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The setting at Musée des Arts Decoratifs

The set-up of the permanent collection, designed by studio Normal (Eloi Chafai and Jean Francoise Dingjian), showcases over 70 years of design, including pieces on display to the public for the first time.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The exhibition seeks to establish a more immediate relationship between the visitor and the objects on display, by minimizing the distance from the objects.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The public can thus enjoy the history of design over the last 70 years, including furniture, objects, wallpaper, toys, graphics, glass and photographs.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The studio Normal, who designed the layout of the six rooms, also selected a newly conceived material for the layout, designed to be a sort of “library”.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo from the studio Normal website)

The products are displayed on platforms and counters on different levels, mixing past and present to offer a complete view of the history of design.

Design for design

The walls partitions and the floors are built with Hexaben Large Plus Clear, a material created by Bencore, very lightweight, neutral and translucent in color, in this case with a satin finish.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. A detail of the Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The aluminium honeycomb core makes it extremely resistant and the appearance makes it perfect as a background, leaving the whole scene to the objects, the protagonists of the museum.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Detail of the panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo from the studio Normal website)

Designed for the aerospace industry, Bencore’s Hexaben is a design product in the broadest meaning. In fact, it combines high performance – strength, lightness, structural strength – with an impressive visual impact, thanks to the translucency and the many colors available.

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New layout at the Muséé des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, designed by Normal studio. Panels Hexaben Large Plus panels by Bencore. (Photo Ercole Salinaro)

The major design classics of Midcentury Modern furniture, such as Arne Jacobsen, Harry Bertoia, Jean Prouvè, from the Space Age period, such as Verner Panton, or more contemporary, such as Roger Tallon, Ettore Sottsass, Enzo Mari, but also more recent times, such as Philippe Starck, Garouste & Bonetti, Konstantin Grcic and Patricia Urquiola are therefore displayed against an ideal background: neutral, technological, architectural.

In the video, a virtual tour of the new setting of the Musée des Arts Decoratifs.

Info: Bencore.it