A new collection of beach furniture, The Elements, made from marine plastic waste

The Elements is a beach furniture project by Rotterdam-based The New Raw studio. Greek designers Panos Sakkas and Foteini Setaki have been working for some time on recycling marine plastic waste, one of the biggest environmental issues of our time. Therefore, The New Raw has experimented with a new approach applying advanced technologies to traditional manual craftsmanship. And the result is an innovative look that translates traditional craftsmanship with 3D printing.

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The Elements, beach furniture from upcycled marine plastic waste

The Elements collection consists of three different products: the fitting room, the footpath, and the sunbed. Formal inspiration for the design comes from sea elements such as the waves, the forms assumed by the sand modelled by the water, marine organisms. Furniture and accessories are in two natural colors, Aqua and Sand. The surfaces of the 3D printed elements are soft and pleasant and their colors recall nature.

Discover Musselblomma by Ikea, the fabric collection made from sea waste

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The Elements, beach furniture from upcycled marine plastic waste

The Elements, a collection made with 720 kg of plastic waste

Each piece in the collection, originally designed for Coca-Cola in Greece, is made from 80% recycled marine plastic. The plastic obtained in this way can be recycled again to potentially become the raw material for future products.

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In summer 2021, the complete series has been installed on six beaches in some of the most famous locations in Greece, from Glyfada to Chania Beach in Crete, Rhodes (Elli Beach), Kefalonia (Skala Beach) and Kythnos (Loutra and Agios Dimitrios beaches). To produce these six collections, The New Raw used 720 kg of plastic waste.

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The Elements, beach furniture from upcycled marine plastic waste

With The Elements, The New Raw shows how a new balance between digital aesthetics, ergonomics and new forms can be created, using 3D printing to develop a new visual language expressing the potential of material recycled from sea waste.